• Make sure you know the difference between erotica and porn.

  • Include the essential ingredients that make up a good story, e.g. plot, character, structure, setting and drama.

  • Remember that sex acts don't drive the story — the people who engage in them do.

  • Avoid the formulaic and clichéd.

  • Build up the sexual tension.

  • Surprise your reader.

  • Bear in mind that less is more. This is a general rule in all art — and yes, you are creating art.

  • Research. If you don't know about something enough to write about it in a believable way, find out.

  • Develop your own voice.

  • Remember the largest sex organ is the brain.
    DON'T:

  • Throw away the rules of good writing you've already learned — or should have learned.

  • Let the sex override the story you're trying to tell. It shouldn't be a replacement for the plot.

  • Write your sex scenes as if they were a play-by-play sports commentary.

  • Demean your work by including stock sex scenes like something from out of a porn video.

  • Forget that you're writing about human experience, which involves emotion and the senses.

  • Pad your work full of adjectives and adverbs; think VERBS.

  • Get stuck in a rut by writing only about what you like or know. If you persist in this, your work will get stale very quickly.

  • Equate explicit with pornographic.

  • Use moronic sexual terminology and spellings.

  • Be a lazy writer. Stretch yourself and aim high.