Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Can A Woman Orgasm During Rape?

This question was on my "topic list" for quite awhile, but it sounded so contradictory that I avoided further investigation. From different sources I have found that a small percentage of women do have orgasm during the rape.

From:

www.a-womans-touch.com

"
The answer is, yes, a woman can have an orgasm even when participating in sex she is not consenting to. The reason is that the type of arousal that leads to sexual pleasure, and the type of arousal your body experiences during fearful and stressful times, are very close to being the same thing.

We have a customer who has orgasms as she is getting ready for presentations that are very stressful for her. That intense arousal your friend felt as a result of resisting this young man could have meant that she was already close to an orgasm.

Orgasms are just reflexes, the result of a combination of physical stimulation and arousal. When this guy provided the physical stimulation, her fear provided the arousal, and she had orgasms. It does not mean she really enjoyed it, or was asking for it.

Yes, sometimes you can tell when a woman has an orgasm. If you have a finger inside a woman's vagina when she has an orgasm, you might feel the muscle contractions in the walls of her vagina. These contractions aren't always noticeable, but they can be. There are other signs of orgasm that may be noticeable, such as flushing of the face and chest, a gasp at the time of orgasm, or suddenly erect nipples. These signs don't always happen for everyone, but they may.

Women don't usually lie about being forced to have non-consensual sex. If that's what she is saying, then the best thing is to believe her. Your friend can help her by being supportive of her, and encouraging her to tell her story if she needs to do so. She may not be interested in pressing charges against this boy, but she should be supported and believed."

From:

http://health.ivillage.com

"Many women who have been raped report that, they, too, experienced an orgasm against their will. So is that, then, "proof" that they enjoyed it? Absolutely not! And even though it seems that their body betrayed their emotions, many women still feel guilt and shame over this occurrence, just as you have. Your body experienced a physiological reaction in response to the physical stimulation it received, yet this in no way means that you were unconsciously desiring or enjoying this vicious assault.

On the contrary, rather than responding to emotional enjoyment and satisfaction, your body simply reacted to the intense physical stimulation. This is not at all dissimilar to your body responding to, say, uninvited and unwelcome tickling. While the body may respond to the stimulation of undesired tickling with laughter and giggles physiologically, the sensations are nonetheless unwanted and unpleasurable -- and such stimulation can even cause discomfort or pain. Hopefully from this example of non-consensual tickling you can begin to better understand and accept the distressing orgasm you experienced during your assault.

There is no reason to consider that your body "betrayed" you that evening, or to continue to make yourself feel guilty for having had an orgasm. While it occurred in the course of an assault, the orgasm still doesn't imply that it was either welcomed or desired. Regarding your guilt, please understand that guilt is an internalized response to having violated what we perceive to be our own or society's values. In your case, it is critical that you now make every effort to fully accept that you did absolutely nothing wrong, so for heaven's sake, let this guilt go once and for all and please stop blaming the victim."

From:

http://www.sun-herald.com

"However, if orgasm does happen, it is the normal, expected response that occurs when all the conditions are met. Unfortunately this is true sometimes even during rape. While it is difficult to believe that orgasmic response is present during nonconsentual intercourse, the truth is that it may be.

Orgasm happens not only with partner sex, but also during solo sex. Kinsey discovered, back in the 50s, that most women can masturbate to orgasm in four minutes. It sometimes takes 20 minutes of active thrusting to bring a woman to orgasm during intercourse. This is because the stimulation the woman receives during intercourse is indirect.

The woman I interviewed for my doctoral paper shared with me about their orgasms. They varied from woman to woman, and were even experienced in different ways in the same woman, at different times. The words used to describe them were: "soft, hard, almost painful, cascading, and one great big one!"

Dr. Joan Ashkin, EdD, LCSW, RN, is a Certified Sexologist, specializing in anxiety, depression, sexual concerns, elder issues and family conflict resolution. She is part of a group practice at Life Transitions, 3505 Depew Circle, Port Charlotte and can be reached at (941) 627-2100.



1 comment:

Anastasia said...

I don't know who the hell Aphrodite is, but I think it's because of irresponsible people who state orgasms to be the case (not you, the very people who actually write up these things), during a psychologically traumatic event, a case of individual terrorism against a woman (it sounds extreme, but that is what rape is).

This bit caught me (Aphrodite): 'Yes, sometimes you can tell when a woman has an orgasm. If you have a finger inside a woman's vagina when she has an orgasm, you might feel the muscle contractions in the walls of her vagina.'

Vaginismus, a condition where a woman's pelvic floor contracts, there is no orgasm or pleasure, it's a painful experience and usually occurs as a result of anxiety. If a woman has great control of her Kegel muscles then she can (at will) contract them, and most women do this when they're holding their urine.

Too many psychologists go by 'self reporting', which isn't accurate because if Kinsey (or Hite's work, or any other survey) is read further, it can also be seen that many women didn't know (many don't or have difficulty) whether they orgasmed or how an orgasm felt. A lot of these 'sexologists' have no medical training, I wonder if many of them are acquainted with physiological responses.

All in all it sets up a grotesque stage where lawyers can use these types of views to prop up their rape cases (when they're defending cases) but yeah, if 'Aphrodite' had comments in her 'site' I'd give her a royal blast about her crap. Already this week, I came upon this other US 'women's wellbeing' site and they had no clue about a New Scientist article about the G Spot it's relation to the urethra and clitoris published in 1998 (the research of a Melbourne doctor) and yet they think they're so 'advanced' in sexual matters, but were 'definitive' when they wrote about the G Spot, as a 'spot' when it's not a separate anatomical spot.